Advice On Moving To Germany

At 82 million inhabitants, Germany has the largest population of all of the EU countries and also ranks third with a huge number of international migrants who have made it their new home.

Its geographical position and strong economy makes it well-placed as a strong business centre, and many families find themselves moving to Germany as part of a career move on behalf of one of the parents.

The advice on moving to Germany is similar to advice on moving to any other country in the world; much of it recommends planning in the first instance and then moves on with suggestions to help to assimilate with locals and being familiar with customs and etiquette. Happily, much of the hard work can be done months before moving to Germany, meaning that when you arrive it shouldn’t feel like too much of a culture shock.

Hopefully, you will have had the opportunity to visit Germany and, in particular, the part where you are moving to, several times. In that time you may have made some friends or just acquaintances – perhaps a friendly owner of a local coffee shop – ensure that you tell everyone that you are moving to Germany and you may be surprised at the encouraging welcome you will receive on your next (long-term) visit.

Learning some German before you move is essential. With the amount of self-learning tools available either online, in books and tapes, and classes offered in adult education centres, there really is no excuse to not be able to master at least the basics. People will appreciate this and warm towards you – equally, you may be the subject of some mild derision if you cannot say please or thank you in German.

Learning the language, studying the culture, establishing contacts for work and planning the move are the essentials for moving to Germany. Contact Europe Remove for efficient removals of all your belongings – domestic or commercial – and up to three weeks of Long and Short Term Storage.