Things to take with you when moving

Whether you’re moving to Switzerland or just across the same city you were born in, there are some things that should be packed up in boxes and others that should stay close to you on the trip. There’s nothing worse than realising that one of the documents you really need is at the bottom of a box, inside a moving van heading towards the Alps at 50 miles an hour.

The essentials

This list is a short one- wallet, passport, and important personal items like credit cards, car keys, and a mobile phone. If you’re relocating to Switzerland the journey from door to door may take a quite a long time so it can be helpful to carry a phone charger too. Batteries can be easily depleted by playing games or browsing the internet while waiting in airport lounge, for example. Keep the batteries topped up so that your phone will be ready to use when needed.

Handy information

It’s also a good idea to pre-load certain phone numbers or at least write them down and carry the list in a safe place, like your purse or wallet. Note down the contact detail for your moving company, an emergency contact back at your starting point, and any numbers you might need on arrival in your new home. If moving between countries, don’t forget the international dialling codes!

Some people also like to look up helpful local contacts before they leave home. The phone number of a local 24-hour plumber is a good example, and make sure that you know the emergency services number if it will no longer be 999. If you get stuck, dialling 112 should work across the EU and in some other countries too.

Pack for your first night

When you and your family have just finished moving to Zurich (or Paris, or Stoke-on-Trent) you’ll probably be tired. Pack a first-night bag and carry that with you, so nobody will have to start unpacking straight away. Include a toothbrush and toiletries, soap, a towel, and a change of clothing. If you expect to arrive at an empty house late at night a roll of toilet paper might also come in very handy!

In the morning, when you’ve had a shower and are feeling fresh and ready to tackle those boxes, you can start unpacking in earnest.

Don’t forget the kids

Mums and dads won’t need us to tell them what to pack for their babies, but toddlers and primary school children sometimes have trouble when moving.  The process can be scary for the younger members of the family, even if it’s just a case of saying goodbye to the old house and moving into the one next door. Relocating over a long distance is certainly daunting for smaller kids.

Let them choose a toy to take on the journey and make sure they have plenty to do. A colouring book can go a long way and a few sweets or cereal bars can also make sure the whole family stays cheerful on the way to their your new home.

Moving to Germany? Learn the Language First

One of the things that can be most isolating when moving to Germany is not being able to speak the language. Although learning a new language is easiest when you immerse yourself in it, you can give yourself a head start by learning some German before you move. Here are some ways you can get a grasp on the language before relocating to Germany:

•    Teach Yourself
Prior to moving to Berlin, Munich or anywhere else in Germany, teach yourself as much of the language as you can. Read a few beginners books and listen to some audio to give you an idea of pronunciation and intonation. You should also try to learn some grammar as this will help you to structure sentences.

•    Take Some Classes
Before you move, aim to take some German classes, both one-on-one and as part of a group. One-on-one classes will enable your tutor to focus on aspects of the language that you need to, or areas that you may be struggling with. Group classes will give you a feel of real world German conversations and knowing other learners will help to keep you motivated.

•    Befriend a Native
Only by talking to a native speaker will you get an indication of how the language is used in the real world. Use the internet to get in contact with native German speakers, and aim to converse via email or via Skype before you move. This will give you a chance to practice your German in a low-pressure environment.

Moving to Belgium to further your career

The EU has created new jobs in the international market, and none more than its central administrative bases in Belgium – both in Brussels and Strasbourg. Whether you’re an intern working for a few weeks to earn some international experience, or if you’re a fully qualified bilingual worker who is an essential cog in the wheels of the EU or EC, then you’ll need to work out how you’re going to get you and your belongings across to Belgium.

Belgium is quite unique in that it has many long, straight roads, so many people choose to move by car. However it’s a long, tiring and arduous journey if you choose to do this yourself, and you’ll have several borders to cross and customs declarations to complete if you set off from the UK towards your new home .

Removals to Belgium can be made less stressful and more productive if you use a specialist removal company. You can leave at the last minute as your belongings go ahead of you, rather than having a stressful time packing and then launching yourself at a new job.

Another consideration is that most people live in small apartments in Brussels in the main cities, and you may need to scale down your belongings so it all fits. If not, you’ll be paying for storage on top of removals, which only adds to your costs in addition to the fluctuating Euro. At least by using a specialist removal service to Belgium, that’s one piece of the move puzzle already solved for you.

Dealing with Stressful House Moves

Everybody knows that moving house can be one the most stressful events that you will ever go through. Indeed, for some it can be even more stressful than a divorce or bereavement. Maybe it is because the serious business of moving comes directly after all the fun stuff like viewing properties and making bids ends.

Certainly, few people would say that packing, notifying banks and utility companies of your move, organising the re-direction of your post to your new address and registering your children with new schools is that much fun. However, it needs to be done and, if you’re moving abroad, there are probably many more things that will need to be added to that list as well

At least if you’re relocating to Germany, Spain, France or indeed any European country; moving your furniture and other possessions doesn’t have to add to your worries. Here at European Removal Experts, we specialise in facilitating household and business removals to Continental European destinations so we can take care of all the stress of moving for you.

If you’re looking for removals to Germany, we can provide you with door-to-door deliveries to and from a wide range of German destinations such as Berlin, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich, Cologne and Stuttgart. Similarly, we can provide comparable services to locations in Spain, France, Italy and beyond.

So, if you want one less stressful aspect to deal with when moving to Germany, France or wherever; look no further than us here at European Removal Experts.

5 Reasons Everyone Should Live Abroad Once

We specialise in moving to Holland, Germany and a bunch of other culturally rich European countries. Here are our top five reasons every person should spend at least a little of their life living continental!

1.    Culture is obviously the first thing that springs to mind. Think of the difference between Edinburgh and Devon, Liverpool and Oxford, Rowen (a tiny village in North Wales) and London! Experiencing different culture can open your eyes to the world in a unique way.

2.    Expanding your career horizons. Experiencing different cultures isn’t just for students and the super-rich. With a little planning and dedication it’s possible for pretty much anyone to find a job abroad. It may even be a step down the career ladder, but in terms of adding interest to your CV, living abroad depicts a superb strength of character.

3.    The thrill of the unknown. Call it “fear” if you like. The thrill/fear of relocating to Germany etc. is something that can be incredibly beneficial in life. Not everyone is OK with getting out of their comfort zone, but even something like a few months relocating to Belgium can have an astounding effect on confidence and mindset.

4.    Culinary exploration. Maybe you’re already a well-fed food aficionado, but if you’re more the pie ‘n’ chips type, living another culinary lifestyle can be a wonderful adventure!

5.    Appreciating home. Sure, it rains a lot in the UK and our sports teams are frequently embarrassed, but true appreciation for all things British is certainly a wonderful side to living abroad. You’ll be surprised what you miss most!

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Don’t Stress About Studying Abroad

Moving abroad to study used to be something of a rarity. But modern universities and educational institutions are often well-equipped when it comes to offering the most dexterous study programmes to students. Moving to Germany to study history, moving to Switzerland to study landscape architecture – making the move to another country could be the most significant period of a young student’s life.

Here are a few tips we’ve picked up over the years for relocating to Amsterdam, rural Spain or a host of other fantastic European destinations.

• Personal accountability is a huge part of studying abroad. Look into things like living costs, set a weekly budget, find out if your U.K bank card will work in an emergency, can a non-resident buy a mobile phone? Etc. Most foreign study positions are well-informed and organised, but make sure you understand all the ins and outs involved as much as possible. Don’t wait around for someone else to hand you a “How To” guide!

• Safety is obviously important. Each place holds different challenges, for example, moving to rural Italy will likely be a much slower pace than relocating to Paris. Seek advice from past residents or even local police websites.

• Keep records; not the boring kind like tax returns, but fun things like photos and journals! They’ll prove invaluable later on.

• Learn at least a little of the language. Aside from simply being good manners, knowing the basics can help you feel more ingratiated in the area.

Making Your Move Easier

The notion of moving abroad is nothing new, but it seems that more and more people are moving to France and Spain, even if they don’t speak the language. People move abroad for many reasons, but when it comes to retiring abroad it is often because they are after a more relaxing lifestyle with better weather.

Relocating to France is not an easy task, however. While it may be just across the water, there is still a lot to organise and the French administration system is notoriously difficult even when fluent in the language. You should never decide to relocate to another country without first doing some research. Just because you enjoy going on holiday there does not mean that you will have the same great experience living there.

If you have done your research and decide that moving is definitely for you, then we can help organise your furniture removals to France and take some of the hassle out of the experience of moving. Once considered an expensive country, the UK is now actually a lot cheaper for buying furniture and other belongings than a lot of the countries on the continent, so organising a furniture removal will work out much cheaper than buying new items when you get there. It also means that you can feel more comfortable in your surroundings by having familiar things around you. At European Removal Experts, we aim to make the process of moving as easy as possible, and deliver your furniture on the date or dates you specify.

How to prepare your children to move to Belgium

If you have decided that you and your family will be moving to Belgium in the near future you may be concerned on how best to prepare your children for this upheaval. You should anticipate that a new environment may be difficult to cope with at first for any child. For this reason it is good practice to ease them into the idea gently early on.

As a country, Belgium is one of the most children friendly, welcoming children from other countries into their culture and lifestyle. It is true that by relocating to Belgium, you are giving your children access to an exceptional quality of education, but you need to find one that suits a child’s individual needs. Researching and discussing schools before hand will help greatly.

The language barrier in Belgian schools can be determined by 3 languages; Dutch, German or French. It is worth looking into the prerequisites of these languages for your child to fully benefit. Parents are also expected to be more actively involved in educating their children in Belgium which may make the transition easier.

Involve your children with all aspects of the move and they will become familiar and accustomed to the idea easier. Removals to Belgium are easy to organise and children will be more inclined to accommodate the idea of moving if they have control over what they take. Allow them to help pack and try to make it as fun and exciting as possible.