Moving to Germany? Learn the Language First

One of the things that can be most isolating when moving to Germany is not being able to speak the language. Although learning a new language is easiest when you immerse yourself in it, you can give yourself a head start by learning some German before you move. Here are some ways you can get a grasp on the language before relocating to Germany:

•    Teach Yourself
Prior to moving to Berlin, Munich or anywhere else in Germany, teach yourself as much of the language as you can. Read a few beginners books and listen to some audio to give you an idea of pronunciation and intonation. You should also try to learn some grammar as this will help you to structure sentences.

•    Take Some Classes
Before you move, aim to take some German classes, both one-on-one and as part of a group. One-on-one classes will enable your tutor to focus on aspects of the language that you need to, or areas that you may be struggling with. Group classes will give you a feel of real world German conversations and knowing other learners will help to keep you motivated.

•    Befriend a Native
Only by talking to a native speaker will you get an indication of how the language is used in the real world. Use the internet to get in contact with native German speakers, and aim to converse via email or via Skype before you move. This will give you a chance to practice your German in a low-pressure environment.

Dealing with Stressful House Moves

Everybody knows that moving house can be one the most stressful events that you will ever go through. Indeed, for some it can be even more stressful than a divorce or bereavement. Maybe it is because the serious business of moving comes directly after all the fun stuff like viewing properties and making bids ends.

Certainly, few people would say that packing, notifying banks and utility companies of your move, organising the re-direction of your post to your new address and registering your children with new schools is that much fun. However, it needs to be done and, if you’re moving abroad, there are probably many more things that will need to be added to that list as well

At least if you’re relocating to Germany, Spain, France or indeed any European country; moving your furniture and other possessions doesn’t have to add to your worries. Here at European Removal Experts, we specialise in facilitating household and business removals to Continental European destinations so we can take care of all the stress of moving for you.

If you’re looking for removals to Germany, we can provide you with door-to-door deliveries to and from a wide range of German destinations such as Berlin, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich, Cologne and Stuttgart. Similarly, we can provide comparable services to locations in Spain, France, Italy and beyond.

So, if you want one less stressful aspect to deal with when moving to Germany, France or wherever; look no further than us here at European Removal Experts.

Making Your Move Easier

The notion of moving abroad is nothing new, but it seems that more and more people are moving to France and Spain, even if they don’t speak the language. People move abroad for many reasons, but when it comes to retiring abroad it is often because they are after a more relaxing lifestyle with better weather.

Relocating to France is not an easy task, however. While it may be just across the water, there is still a lot to organise and the French administration system is notoriously difficult even when fluent in the language. You should never decide to relocate to another country without first doing some research. Just because you enjoy going on holiday there does not mean that you will have the same great experience living there.

If you have done your research and decide that moving is definitely for you, then we can help organise your furniture removals to France and take some of the hassle out of the experience of moving. Once considered an expensive country, the UK is now actually a lot cheaper for buying furniture and other belongings than a lot of the countries on the continent, so organising a furniture removal will work out much cheaper than buying new items when you get there. It also means that you can feel more comfortable in your surroundings by having familiar things around you. At European Removal Experts, we aim to make the process of moving as easy as possible, and deliver your furniture on the date or dates you specify.

Move at Your Own Pace

Deciding to move to another country means a big change with a lot to organise. The last thing you want to do when you get there is to have to go out and buy all new furniture, and this is where we can help. We understand that moving to Germany or any other Western European country means that you’ll have a lot of other things going on, and so we try and make moving your furniture as hassle-free as possible.

If you are renovating your property, then no doubt you won’t want to receive all your furniture at the same time as you’ll have nowhere to put it. When you’re relocating to Germany, you don’t want to have to be back and forth in a rented vehicle to pick up items of furniture as you go, which is why we can help you move in stages. We will store your possessions and deliver them to you on the dates you specify, so you can move in to your new home over a gradual period of time rather than trying to deal with everything at once. With two weeks Long and Short Term Storage, you needn’t feel like you need to rush the process.

If you’re moving to Berlin, it’s even easier because we carry out weekly trips to this and many other cities around Europe, thereby making it possible to give you even cheaper prices. Call or email us now and we’ll give you a quote, or you can use our online free quote service if you prefer.

Make Your Move to Germany as Painless as Possible

Moving to Germany from the UK can be extremely nerve wracking, but it’s also hugely exciting. If you’ve decided to make the move, then you’ll have a lot of planning to do. Spending time preparing yourself before you make your move will help everything run as smoothly as possible.

• Let as many people as possible know that you are relocating to Germany. Friends and family will be happy to do anything they can to help you with your move, and one of them may even know someone in the area you’re moving too who can help you settle in.

• Arrange your removals to Germany as soon as you possibly can. This will help you to plan how much you can take and what you may not be able to. By planning in advance, you will have the time to cope with any problems that may arise.

• Do as much research as you can about your new home. Aim to find out what you will need to do before you move to Germany, and what will need to be done after you arrive.

• Learn as much German as you can before you move. Even if you’re unable to learn much, try to memorise some key words and phrases that will aid you in your move.

• Keep a permanent address and bank account in the UK. This will make things much easier for you when you come for visits, or if you decide to move back.

Moving To A European Country

If you’re planning on moving to a European country, such as moving to France or moving to Germany, you have a lot to think about and a lot to plan over the next few weeks and months.

One of most important things to think about is, do you speak the language, and will you need to learn it? While many people in France and Germany do speak English, certainly not everyone does. If you are going to be living in one of these countries and mingling with the locals, eating in restaurants, and shopping in their markets and shops, it’s wise to take a few language classes before you go, or purchase language materials that you can study on your own.

You’ll also want to think about the climate. While western Europe’s climate may not be drastically different to that of the UK, there will be some differences. Certainly some areas of France can be very hot in the summer months, and you may need to make some adjustments in your wardrobe. And whether you are moving to France, Germany, Switzerland, Belgium, or Holland, you’ll want to take a variety of clothes good for any weather.

But probably the most practical of all the things you will need to plan is how you will move your furniture and belongings. Here at Europe Removal, we specialize in moving people to western Europe from the UK. We do moves from all over the UK including Scotland and Northern Ireland. Ask for a quote today and we can help you get started relocating to Germany or France, or wherever it is you want to go.

Moving to Germany Read this First

When times are tough due to recession and other factors over which we have no control, there is a tendency to look abroad for a country where we can start a new life. This is the case at the moment, and many British people are thinking of moving to Germany to find that new career and build a new life. We’ve been here before, of course. If you are of a certain age you will remember the television series Auf Weidersein Pet, the story of the bricklayers who left the north east to find work in Germany. This was based on real events when thousands of men in the construction industry were moving to Germany and moving to Holland to find work in the early eighties.

If you have the right qualifications and work in a field where your skills are in high demand, you’ll be more sure of finding the right job in Germany, which means you won’t have to live in such Spartan conditions. Although many German people speak perfect English, if you speak the language this will give you an even better chance of securing the job you want. So, if you are thinking of moving to Germany, the first thing to do is enrol on a language course which will enhance your prospects of finding the right job and building a new life for you and your family.

The Benefits of Moving to Germany

Many people from Britain have moved abroad to work over recent years, some to European countries and others further afield, to Australia and New Zealand for example.

Although these two antipodean nations are seen as the favourite choice for Britons seeking a new life, a lot of people are moving to Germany and other European countries with their jobs.

This has many benefits, the main one being it is a lot easier to get back to the UK from mainland Europe. Although you may feel that you are leaving the country behind when you are planning on moving to Germany or moving to France, there will be occasions when you need to return home. It’s something we don’t like to think about, but our parents aren’t getting any younger are they?

When you are thinking about moving to Germany, you can be assured that if you do need to get home in a hurry for whatever reason you are just a couple of hours flight away.

Now we have sorted that particular aspect out, how much thought have you given to the actual logistics of moving to Germany? Have you organised a company to take care of moving your furniture and other belongings yet? If not, you need to make sure that the company you choose has plenty of experience in this field because the last thing you need once you arrive at your new home is to find that your possessions have been damaged or broken in transit.

European Removal Experts are the experts, so make sure you talk to them when planning your move abroad.

Which Countries Speak Your Language?

For some, a move abroad is both exciting and scary. Over time you will almost certainly find yourself becoming bi-lingual, if not multi-lingual. But for those who speak only their native tongue before they move, the idea of finding themselves unable to communicate at all with those around them can be quite daunting.

So if you are looking to move abroad, it is worth knowing which European countries are most likely to be able to help you out and speak your language whilst you are still struggling with theirs.

Moving to Germany may be the best idea for those not wanting to find themselves lost for words in their new home. Surprisingly, Germany has almost the same number of English speakers as Britain itself, with 59% of its population fluent in English. Moving to Germany therefore means that more than every other person you meet will be able to speak your language and in turn help you to learn theirs.

Moving to Holland is also a great move for those who want to experience a new country but don’t want to feel completely cut off from the English language. Moving to Holland, you will find a massive 87% of people able to speak English. With a much lower population than Germany that means that there aren’t as many English speakers, but a much higher percentage, meaning that almost everyone you meet will be able to help you out if you are struggling with their language.

Belgium and France also have huge numbers of English speaking residents, so you really are spoilt for choice.

Driving Wild: European Driving Guide

So, you’re moving to France, well you’ll want to keep the car’s log book on hand if you want to avoid a hefty fine upon involvement in a traffic accident or offence! Moving to Germany? Do you know what the upper speed limit of the Autobahn is? There isn’t one! Moving to Holland? Did you know that a red triangle light at a roundabout means roundabout traffic has right of way? Only if the light is OUT does traffic entering the roundabout have right of way. Europe is a patchwork of different (and continually changing!) traffic laws, guidelines and protocols.

The legal side of foreign driving – particularly when crossing multiple borders – is rarely simple. However, for the most part, prudence, rationality, patience and airing on the side of caution will get you far.

As a UK citizen, your UK driving license covers all EC/EEA countries. It’s worth noting that the age limits of a country override UK age limits. If you’re seventeen-year-old UK driving license holder, wave goodbye to driving until you reach eighteen in Germany, Holland, Norway, Sweden, France, Denmark, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, Finland, Luxemburg, Belgium, Malta and Portugal!

To drive in a non-EC/EAA country, purchase an IDP (International Driving Permit) for £5.50; applications are available at the Post Office. Most IDPs are valid for a year and are non-renewable from abroad. After one year applicants must sit the native driving test of their domicile country.

Familiarising yourself with local traffic protocols and etiquette will take a little time and patience. Our advice? Be cautious, be polite, be diligent.