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Your European Emigration Checklist

A move to the EU is going to be much easier than emigration to somewhere such as America or Australia. As a British citizen you can move freely around the European Economic Area, settling wherever you see fit without need to apply for visas or undergo rigorous interviews or points based tests.

However, whether you are moving to Belgium or moving to Holland it is still not as simple as getting a plane ticket and a passport, and there are still a number of things that you need to ensure you do before you head off towards that sunset.

Before heading off, you need to ensure you talk to HM Revenue & Customs regarding your liability for tax. The laws will differ depending on where you are moving to so don’t just assume that moving to Belgium will carry the same rules as if you were heading to Spain. In fact, you should spend time researching all the laws for the given country that you plan to move to so that you are fully aware of both your rights and the things that could potentially land you in trouble.

Fully understand the situation regarding healthcare. Again the benefits you will be allowed will differ from country to country and it is essential that you are adequately covered from the very start of your life abroad.

Finally, you need to let people know you are going. Even for those who simply want to disappear and get away from their current life, there are certain people who will need to be informed of the dates you leave from schools and banks to any outstanding creditors that may well need paying after you move. You also need to remember to forward your post so that any important letters reach you no matter whether you are moving to Holland or the furthest reaches of the desert.

Moving to Germany Read this First

When times are tough due to recession and other factors over which we have no control, there is a tendency to look abroad for a country where we can start a new life. This is the case at the moment, and many British people are thinking of moving to Germany to find that new career and build a new life. We’ve been here before, of course. If you are of a certain age you will remember the television series Auf Weidersein Pet, the story of the bricklayers who left the north east to find work in Germany. This was based on real events when thousands of men in the construction industry were moving to Germany and moving to Holland to find work in the early eighties.

If you have the right qualifications and work in a field where your skills are in high demand, you’ll be more sure of finding the right job in Germany, which means you won’t have to live in such Spartan conditions. Although many German people speak perfect English, if you speak the language this will give you an even better chance of securing the job you want. So, if you are thinking of moving to Germany, the first thing to do is enrol on a language course which will enhance your prospects of finding the right job and building a new life for you and your family.

A Few Facts about Holland

Although Holland has something of a reputation as a free and easy, Bohemian kind of place, full of liberal minded locals who like to experiment with various substances which are illicit in many countries, this is really only the case with Amsterdam. If you’ve spent any time there, you’ll know exactly what I mean, but it would be wrong to think that the rest of the country follows the lead of this particular city. If you are moving to Holland because of work commitments, the chances are you’ll have a pretty good idea of what to expect when you get there.

You may have spent time working in one of the major Dutch cities, and now you have been asked by your company to think about moving to Holland to further your career. If this is the case, you will be getting help with relocation fees and other expenses which you will incur, so make sure that you choose the best company to take care of moving your belongings and furniture when you are moving to Holland, moving to Germany or moving to any European country. European Removal Experts have many years experience in this field and have built themselves an enviable reputation for professionalism. This is what you need when you are moving to Holland. The move itself may be traumatic – particularly if you have young children – so why not make it as easy and as smooth as possible by asking the professionals to take care of the move for you?

The Benefits of Moving to Germany

Many people from Britain have moved abroad to work over recent years, some to European countries and others further afield, to Australia and New Zealand for example.

Although these two antipodean nations are seen as the favourite choice for Britons seeking a new life, a lot of people are moving to Germany and other European countries with their jobs.

This has many benefits, the main one being it is a lot easier to get back to the UK from mainland Europe. Although you may feel that you are leaving the country behind when you are planning on moving to Germany or moving to France, there will be occasions when you need to return home. It’s something we don’t like to think about, but our parents aren’t getting any younger are they?

When you are thinking about moving to Germany, you can be assured that if you do need to get home in a hurry for whatever reason you are just a couple of hours flight away.

Now we have sorted that particular aspect out, how much thought have you given to the actual logistics of moving to Germany? Have you organised a company to take care of moving your furniture and other belongings yet? If not, you need to make sure that the company you choose has plenty of experience in this field because the last thing you need once you arrive at your new home is to find that your possessions have been damaged or broken in transit.

European Removal Experts are the experts, so make sure you talk to them when planning your move abroad.

The Best Way To See Europe

Britain is a very important part of the EU. Yet, with our own currency and the fact that we are totally cut off from all the other countries in our continent, it can sometimes feel like we are in our own little bubble and completely disconnected from the rest of Europe.

We are also quite far away from many parts of Europe which can make trying to see the whole continent a very costly and time-consuming operation, and yet we have one of the most culturally rich continents on the earth and it is extremely edifying and rewarding for us to experience all of those cultures as best we can.

For those who want to see as much of Europe as possible, then relocating and moving to Switzerland or moving to France will put you in a much better position to fully immerse yourself in our continent’s culture. Moving to Switzerland for instance will put you almost perfectly in the middle of Europe and mean that most countries are quickly and easily accessible by car or train.

Moving to France can offer very similar benefits, depending on which part of the vast country you move to and you can very easily find yourself experiencing and learning so much more about the world around us than you are ever able to with the UK as your base.

For those who love to travel and love to experience the cultures of our continental brethren, a move to Europe will offer you so much more potential to see and experience much more of what the world has to offer.

Reasons to Move Abroad

There probably aren’t many people these days who at some point in their lives haven’t considered packing up and moving on, branching out and settling down in another country. And in fairness, who could blame them. Our summers seem to get shorter every year and the rest if the time we have to settle with a mixture of cold, rain and cold rain.

But our terrible weather is not the only reason why more and more people are not just considering heading off to brighter skies, but actually putting those thoughts into action.

Quality of life in Britain is pretty much the worst in Europe. We die earlier, retire later, and in the meantime get less time off than most of our European cousins. Our diet is worse and many people look to the diets of those in other countries with a great sense of longing, the Mediterranean fare being much more appetising than our cholesterol-packed cuisines.

Moving to France, or even further afield can actually simply just make life much less stressful. The pace of life is usually much more relaxed abroad than it is in the UK, and with such beautiful scenery and of course that old weather being much better, moving abroad often improves people’s moods greatly.

Culture is also often a big reason for people to move to places such as France, whilst meeting new people and learning a new language also rate highly. Moving to Germany is always a great way to learn their language if you’ve always wanted to.

However, it is worth remembering that moving doesn’t mean you want to leave everything totally behind. Moving to some of our closest neighbours will make it much easier to get home and see relatives, whilst still enjoying all the benefits of a fresh start. When moving to France or moving to Germany the channel tunnel is so easy to access that you can be home whenever you want. And you may just find that the UK is a great place to visit, but you just wouldn’t want to live there.

The Best Places to Live In Europe

It may not have come as much of a surprise to those Brits who love to moan, but this year Britain was actually found to be the worst place in Europe for quality of life. So, maybe we’re not a country of people who love to moan after all, maybe we’re just a country of people who are realistic?

Why is it such a bad place to live? Well, the average wage has fallen dramatically whilst we seem to have a higher retirement age and a lot less holiday allowance than most of Europe. Not only that, but we also have a much lower life expectancy than most of our neighbours, with our closest neighbours France, Germany and Holland all long outliving us. Plus, whilst for many years we were miserable but well off, we now seem to be miserable and poor.

Where is the best place to live? Well, for the second year running it is the French who have the best quality of life. Which may explain why so many people are choosing to move there. With it being so close, enjoying better whether than us and with many of us still having a basic grasp of the language, it seems to make perfect sense that moving to France is on so many peoples’ minds.

Not only that, but along with France (which topped the list again), the top ten best places to live in the world includes Germany, Switzerland and Belgium, with Britain coming in nowhere near.

So if you thought you were miserable, then the chances are you were right, but it might not be your fault. For those who want to be happier then moving to France or moving to Germany may well be the answer. Fifty years ago moving to Germany or France would have been unthought-of. But today it might be the best way to be happy.

Going Dutch

If you are moving to Holland and you are intending to find a job when you get there, the first thing to say is Good Luck! As with most countries at the moment, finding work isn’t as easy as it used to be just a couple of years ago, so if you are moving to Holland, or moving to France for that matter, it’s probably best to find employment before you leave. Having said that, if you are moving to Holland and are prepared to put the work in to find a job, there are a couple of ways you can look for work.

The public employment service – or the CWI, which is the Centre for Work and Income –  plays a huge role in the Dutch labour market as they help people find jobs in a similar way to the JobCentre here in the UK.

The staff at the CWI are very involved and will give as much help as you ask for when looking for a job, whether you are Dutch or moving to Holland from another country.

To get help from the CWI you need the equivalent of our national insurance number.  Every Dutch citizen obtains a personal registration number, called a SOFI-nummer, at the age of fourteen. Those moving to Holland can get a SOFI-nummer at the local tax office.

The bottom line is that, when it comes to moving to Holland, you will find the same problems – and solutions – as you will find here when you are looking for a job, so good luck!

Useful Advice for Moving to Germany

If you are thinking of moving to Germany with your job, you will want to make sure you choose the home which is right for you. If you are moving to Germany alone, this is not such a problem, but if you are taking your family you will need to do some homework on how to find the right accommodation.

Depending on the location you choose, finding a flat or house is similar to the way you would do it here in the UK, but there are some differences which you should be aware of before moving to Germany. For example, don’t expect to see a ‘For Sale’ sign outside a property. In Germany, this is not a common way of advertising that a property is available for sale or rent.

Many properties are published in the newspapers, and in the last few years property websites have sprung up which provide extensive listings on apartments and houses for sale as well as rental units. These websites also have extensive information on financing and other topics related to buying and renting property for those who are moving to Germany.

One term to watch out for when looking at property adverts is ‘Grosszügige Räume’, which translates as ‘large room’ or ‘very spacious’. As estate agents all over the world employ the same tactics when it comes to describing a property, this actually means that the house is very expensive to heat, which is something you may want to bear in mind when you are moving to Germany.

Moving to Belgium Let the Experts Help You

Moving home can be a traumatic experience at the best of times, but when you are moving abroad the stress and trauma involved can be magnified many times over. If you are moving to Belgium there are some things you should be aware of before you organise your belongings to be transported across the North Sea. Although we have been members of the European Union since 1973, moving to Belgium – or moving to Germany and any other EU country – is not as straight forward as it could be, especially if you are living in Britain but you are not a UK passport holder. For example, when you are moving to Belgium you should know that for all visits of longer than 90 days a visa is required for non-EU citizens.

With the exception of Cyprus and Malta, nationals of the new European Union Member States are currently subject to transition arrangements which remain in place for two years and require a long-stay visa for those who are moving to Belgium. However, if you are self-employed you will be exempt from the visa requirement.

Now we have cleared up the boring bit about moving to Belgium, it’s time to start planning the logistics involved in getting your furniture moved. Of course, you could do it yourself by hiring a lorry, but why add to the stress by doing this? Get in touch with the people at Europemove.com and they will take care of everything for you, which means you will be free to concentrate on your new life.