Posts

Moving to France – Things You Don’t Need

Moving to France can be a great change of scenery, however despite the relative ease of moving to another EU country it can still be a very daunting experience. There might be a temptation to take all of your home comforts when you move, however this – depending on what your planning on taking of course – could be a mistake.

So what kinds of things will your definitely not need?

Well considering that France is an highly developed nation you don’t technically need anything, however some things just wont work; for example, certain fittings such as door knobs will be different in France than they are in the UK; therefore, especially if your going over to France to renovate, this could cause an issue.

Electrical goods will also cause a potential issue, and, for example, PAL televisions will only work in monochrome. Also, any electrical items will require an adaptor to work in the plug, and some might not work altogether due to the different voltage. The best advice, when it comes to white goods and electrical items would be to buy them in France, as this will on the one hand ensure that they function, whilst on the other hand save you on removal costs when moving to France.

Whilst some of your UK items aren’t going to work in France, surely one of the best things about moving to France is that you get to try new things, and therefore if you are pining for your home comforts, just think of all that fine wine and cheese!

Finding a French Property

If you are planning on moving to France then the biggest challenge will be to find a property; unfortunately France is a very “document heavy” society and therefore there can be a lot of leg-work before you close the deal; this however, is a little ahead of ourselves! And before you buy a property, quite obviously your going to need to find a property.

The first question your going to need to ask yourself is “why are you moving to France in the first place?” The answer to which will determine the kind of property that will be most suitable to your needs; for example, do you plan on living in France for a certain number of months of the year or are looking for a permanent residence?

Of course, your perfect property will be a matter of personal taste, however as a general rule a pied-à-terre (literally meaning foot on the ground) – which is a small place – will be perfectly suited as a temporary or “short-term” residence.

Also, if you are moving to France on a temporary rather than permanent basis, then it is likely that you will be in France for the warmer months, and therefore issues like insulation and heating costs may not be as permanent than if you were moving to France permanently.

Remember, France is a lot bigger than the UK, so moving to France will be markedly different depending on exactly where you plan on moving, for example a move to Paris will have its own challenges, in terms, for example, parking.

Don’t Go Hungry If You Are Moving To France

It’s a sign of the modern times we live in. Take a walk down any high street in the UK today, and you will see shops catering for the people who have moved to Britain from all over the globe. But this phenomena is not restricted to our shores. If you are planning on moving to France, you can be sure that there will be shops there catering for the thousands of Britons who have decided that moving to France is for them. But before you get too excited about the possibility of being able to buy your favourite foods, its worth pointing out that in some rural areas of the country, you will be hard pushed to find English food.

Many large supermarkets in France stock a range of international products which should mean you will find old favourites like baked beans, Marmite, Typhoo tea bags and HP sauce on the UK shelf. There is one thing to bear in mind if you are moving to France and want to keep in touch with your British taste buds. While you may not mind shelling out fifteen Euros for a Christmas pudding once a year, the everyday items you may be missing are also very expensive. Even in the largest hypermarkets, a small jar of Marmite can cost €5 while a tin of baked beans will set you back €3. And if you want the right bread for your beans on toast, you can imagine the cost!